Sports Law Blog
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Tuesday, June 26, 2012
 
Choosing your own decisionmaking process

At Sunday's Olympic Trials in the women's 100m, there was a tie for third place (the final spot on the team). And now the question is how to break the tie, with the options being a coin flip or a run-off between the two women, Allyson Felix and Jeneba Tarmoh. But it gets more complicated, because the choice is delegated to the runners: If they agree on a process, they use that. If they disagree on their preferences, they use a run-off. And if no one expresses a preference, they use a coin flip.

This raises a couple of interesting issues:

1) As discussed here, Olympic officials have avoided making a decision (and having to provide reasons for the decision) by delegating the choice to the participants, something judges typically are unable to do.

2) Is there any doubt that world-class athletes will choose the run-off? And, if so, why? Is it fear of randomness? Is there something unique about professional athletes?

3) Note the game theory element to this. If they state a preference and disagree, it's a run-off; if one or both decline to state a preference, it's a coin flip.







1 Comments:

Yes, actually quite refreshing. Lawyers are not involved.

Anonymous Anonymous -- 6/26/2012 1:57 PM  


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